“Everyone wants to kick your butt.” Sam Sumyk on Eugenie Bouchard interviewed by @sophiedorgan in l’Équipe

Sam Sumyk is the French coach of the Canadian Eugenie Bouchard. With his characteristic straight shooting, he talks about the current difficulties of the Wimbledon 2014 finalist.

After having stopped working with Victoria Azarenka at the Australian Open at the end of January, Sam Sumyk wanted to stay put at his home in Los Angeles and satisfy his passion for surfing. In February he finally caught the Eugenie Bouchard wave and decided to throw himself into the water with the twenty-one year-old Canadian who had become one of the big women stars of last season. The results have as yet not been there this year for the number six player in the world, but the Breton isn’t the type to panic in the storm. After his player’s loss in Rome, he sat down to talk about his new adventure.

You’ve been working with Eugenie Bouchard since February. What gave you the desire to work with her?

She wanted to work with me. She’d been looking for a while and the girl said, “That’s him, the guy from the far end of Bretagne I have a good feeling for.” I know some big coaching names have tried. Sometimes you just have to act and think later. It’s a very personal decision. I didn’t think about her very much. I told myself: “I’ll learn a lot through her. I’ll keep my novice’s spirit.”

You have no regrets?

I can’t regret, because I’m the one who decided to stop with Azarenka and agreed to start with Eugenie. I could have said no, it was in my hands. What I want to do is coach and, every morning, not have the feeling I’m going to work. I’m exactly where I want to be. No one forced me.

But the results are lagging …

You have several choices when going through a storm. You can get depressed, you can attach a weight to your leg and jump of a bridge. Or, if you have character, and I think my player has lots of character, you try and bounce back. I know she’s going in that direction. Everything changed for her after her Wimbledon final.

Everything went very quickly for her.

Too quickly even. She went from “we don’t know who she is” to a Slam final. That’s heavy. All the parameters change. When you have good results and climb in the rankings, you enter the circle of the most hated players on the tour. By that I mean everyone wants to kick your butt. You have to be ready for that. Normally you prepare for it. She’s learning by doing. That’s very different, but I think she has everything it takes to pull through.

What are her qualities?

She has a lot of character, but she’s a bit more tortured at the moment. Very ambitious and perfectionist people are necessarily tortured. Her style of play is a quality. It’s clean hitting. It’s not the most powerful, but she has an enormous work capacity. Her ambition too, obviously, even if it’s weighing her down at the moment. It’s up to me to guide her and us, the team, to make an athlete out of her. She thirsts for knowledge.

But she’s having a crisis of confidence, no?

Yes, that’s obviously a part of it. Confidence, it’s the nerve of war. There’s the confidence that comes with results. There’s also self-confidence, that’s different. If we talk about results, obviously we’re lacking them a bit, but she’s on the right path. With the right attitude.

What’s the right attitude?

Even if it doesn’t assuage all worries, the better prepared you are, the better you’ll approach the tournaments. You have to take care of the things that depend on you. The rest, get rid of them right away. It’s good to create a new dynamic, to break certain habits etc. There’s a team around her that believes in her.

She has a semi to defend at Roland Garros …

It’s still a privilege to defend a semi-final. She’ll do it or she won’t. We don’t care. It won’t make her a worse player in 2015 than in 2014.  A number doesn’t determine if you’re a good player or not. That’s people’s opinions and we couldn’t care less.

But abstracting from all that is complicated, especially for a player so much in the media’s eye like that…

It’s part of the parameters you have to manage. Honestly, if the media didn’t ask her about it at every interview, I think she’d think a bit about it, but no more.

We expect too much from her?

Don’t worry, she expects a lot from herself! And we prefer to think in terms of progress and quality of play. When you’re among the very best you necessarily have points to defend every week. It’s no worse than someone who has to earn a salary every week to feed the family! I think it’s better (smiles).

For her peace of mind, her decision not to shake the hand of her opponent in Fed Cup was perhaps not a very good idea …

It’s not one of the best things she’s done, but it’s her business. She has her opinions and the right to have them. I don’t endorse it, I don’t say it’s good, but there are worse things on the planet …

It can unsettle her.Unless she wants to be the “bad girl” of the tour?

It doesn’t excuse her, but she has the naïvety to think that’s it’s not very serious. One shouldn’t make a big deal out of it. It’s not helpful. We haven’t spoken about it. Me, what I’ve noticed is that she was very nice with everyone. She says thank you, hello etc. And, at least, it has the merit of being honest. People sit on honesty in 2015. My job is to make her one of the best players in the world. The rest I leave to others.

Translated by MAN

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A long process for Eugenie by @JessicaLapinski

Translation of this piece from Le Journal de Montréal website by Jessica Lapinski

The short trip back home for Eugenie Bouchard didn’t have the desired result. On the contrary. In search of wins, “Genie” left Montréal with two losses instead. What’s more, two losses mired in controversy.

It was more than disappointing; it was sad. Those two matches, against courageous but beatable Romanians, were supposed to help cure her ailing confidence. Instead, it was a troubled, occasionally irritated Bouchard who showed up for the press conference after her second loss.

Only a little more than two months ago she was in the quarter-finals of the Australian Open. Yes, that wasn’t as good as her semi-final of the year before, but it was a result worthy of her world ranking of seven.

What happened in these last weeks for the future champion to transform into a player satisfied with simply keeping the ball in play? Into a player unable to beat an opponent ranked lower than 60th.?

What happened that caused Bouchard’s aggressive game, which allowed her to beat some of the best, to seemingly reverse itself?

No explanations

Sunday, even Eugenie herself couldn’t find reasons for her setbacks. “I really have no explanation. I don’t feel like myself on the court,” she declared, lamenting her uncharacteristic lack of aggression.

But as recently as Wednesday, Bouchard affirmed that she felt at ease on the courts despite a start to the season that, all in all, was disappointing. Since Melbourne, she’s won two small matches and has now lost five in a row, all against players ranked lower than 60.

“There are signs, except I don’t think there’s only one solution,” says Sylvain Bruneau, her Fed Cup captain.

“We haven’t talked about it together, but yes, I was hoping this weekend would allow her to regain a bit of confidence. Sometimes it only takes one or two wins to do that.”

Among the signs is the well-known second-year jinx. In her press conference, Bouchard herself talked about this “sophomore slump”, this “evil” that sometimes affects athletes in all sports after a phenomenal first year.

Bruneau agrees: “After her first season, she now needs to learn how to manage the expectations,” he explains.

Then there was the coaching change. Last week Bouchard alluded to a period of adaptation, especially for a girl who had been advised by the same man, Nick Saviano, for eight years.

Several have asked questions about the relationship between Bouchard and Sam Sumyk. Both have a strong temperament, and the Québecker doesn’t seem to be assimilating what the Frenchman is trying to teach her, both tactically and technically.

“It’s a big change and I need to adjust,” she insisted on Wednesday. “I’ve had the same coach since I was 12. Sumyk is more direct. I like the ideas he has about my game. We can improve all aspects of it.”

“In tennis, when you don’t have the feel, when you don’t have your usual reference points, you tend to revert to what you did well with in the past, but that doesn’t always work,” adds Bruneau. He also talks about a period of adaptation.

Patience, patience …

What Bruneau especially advocates is patience. For her fans as much as for Genie.

Bouchard also mentioned the process she’s going through right now. A process during which she’ll lose, that’s certain, but which should eventually bring her back on the right track.

It might be long, and, judging from last weekend, it won’t be free from tears and broken racquets. But at 21, Eugenie Bouchard still has time to renew acquaintance with success.

It will be one match at a time, one win at a time.

Translated by MAN